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Re: inheritable file system objects, part 1: security



Rob Rodgers wrote:
>

[stuff deleted]

> If you can manipulate files, you can blow them away.  Java is next to
> useless because of the inability to store files locally.  Security
> capabilities don't mean anything if people don't use them, and
*consumers*
> using *consumer devices* wont be doing ss, they'll be storing their
files
> wherever.

I'm not sure that I agree with part of your statement above.  When you
indicate that "Java is next to useless because of the inability to store
files locally." I'm not sure what your definition of "locally" is.  My
perception is one of time and accessibility ... so locally doesn't mean
the same as "on my local hard drive."  I'm not sure that in the near
future I want my files on my local storage device ... I want my data and
information available to me where ever I might be in the world.  So Java
actually meets my requirements (and so does Inferno, which I currently
prefer) by providing almost transparent access to resources from
anywhere.  When I click "File->Save" in an application, all I'm really
concerned with is that I can later click "File->Open" and access that
information.  I would almost rather that someone else provide
replication, caching, back-up, and global availability of my information
... with me granting access controls.

I believe that consumers will also expect this of their "intelligent
appliances" as they begin to use them.  We are currently working on
several projects that follow this model of client server development.
If you look at the progression from SMTP to POP3 to IMAP4 you see that
the data/message store has moved further and further from me and my
"desktop."  With Java or Inferno, that "desktop" could be my home PC, a
Java terminal in a waiting room, or an Inferno phone at the airport.

I think that ISPs will discover the power of services that they can
offer in globally accessible storage.  It will become yet another
utility that we have ... just like the gas bill, the water bill, the
cable bill, there will be the net bill.

> Security is available today, if you want it.
> Consumers don't use it when it's available.
> : Inferno will not be any safer in practice than anything else.

Agreed.  It's the whole model that has to change to support the easy
access to these capabilities in a way that is transparent to the
consumer.

> RSR

Scott C. Lemon
Network Integration, Inc.


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<DT>Rob Rodgers wrote:<BR>
&gt;&nbsp;<BR>
<BR></DT>

<DT>[stuff deleted]</DT>

<DT>&nbsp;</DT>

<DT>&gt; If you can manipulate files, you can blow them away.&nbsp; Java
is next to<BR>
&gt; useless because of the inability to store files locally.&nbsp;
Security<BR>
&gt; capabilities don't mean anything if people don't use them, and
*consumers*<BR>
&gt; using *consumer devices* wont be doing ss, they'll be storing their
files<BR>
&gt; wherever.<BR>
<BR></DT>

<DT>I'm not sure that I agree with part of your statement above.&nbsp;
When you indicate that &quot;Java is next to useless because of the inability
to store files locally.&quot; I'm not sure what your definition of
&quot;locally&quot;
is.&nbsp; My perception is one of time and accessibility ... so locally
doesn't mean the same as &quot;on my local hard drive.&quot;&nbsp; I'm
not sure that in the near future I want my files on my local storage device
... I want my data and information available to me where ever I might be
in the world.&nbsp; So Java actually meets my requirements (and so does
Inferno, which I currently prefer) by providing almost transparent access
to resources from anywhere.&nbsp; When I click &quot;File-&gt;Save&quot;
in an application, all I'm really concerned with is that I can later click
&quot;File-&gt;Open&quot; and access that information.&nbsp; I would almost
rather that someone else provide replication, caching, back-up, and global
availability of my information ... with me granting access controls.</DT>

<DT>&nbsp;</DT>

<DT>I believe that consumers will also expect this of their &quot;intelligent
appliances&quot; as they begin to use them.&nbsp; We are currently working
on several projects that follow this model of client server development.&nbsp;
If you look at the progression from SMTP to POP3 to IMAP4 you see that
the data/message store has moved further and further from me and my
&quot;desktop.&quot;&nbsp;
With Java or Inferno, that &quot;desktop&quot; could be my home PC, a Java
terminal in a waiting room, or an Inferno phone at the airport.</DT>

<DT>&nbsp;</DT>

<DT>I think that ISPs will discover the power of services that they can
offer in globally accessible storage.&nbsp; It will become yet another
utility that we have ... just like the gas bill, the water bill, the cable
bill, there will be the net bill.</DT>

<DT>&nbsp;</DT>

<DT>&gt; Security is available today, if you want it.<BR>
&gt; Consumers don't use it when it's available.<BR>
&gt; : Inferno will not be any safer in practice than anything else.<BR>
<BR></DT>

<DT>Agreed.&nbsp; It's the whole model that has to change to support the
easy access to these capabilities in a way that is transparent to the
consumer.</DT>

<DT>&nbsp;</DT>

<DT>&gt; RSR<BR>
<BR></DT>

<DT>Scott C. Lemon</DT>

<DT>Network&nbsp;Integration, Inc.</DT>

<DT>&nbsp;</DT>

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