[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: Inferno marketing vs. Java marketing



> The biggest mistake Sun ever made was giving the kind of open ended
licence
> they gave to Mr Bill for the development of Java versions 

And their altenative was... ?  

Let Netscape do it?  

(Look at how well NS has treated Java.)

> Inferno now has a tremendous opportunity to benefit from the anti-gates
> sentiments among many software developers and entrepreneurrial types

Anyone in this business who gets their undies in a bind over Bill Gates or
Microsoft has *already* lost the war.  Gates is all business -- he doesn't
try and play villian, and he doesn't try to play (hypocritical) savior
(Hello, Mr. Ellison!) or visionary.  

Just business. 

>From a business point of view, a lot of people are overlooking the obvious
in this thread and focusing on the hype and the technology.  

Forget portability.  Forget the VM.  Forgetting all of that, Java is,
simply put, a much better language than either C or C++.  Programmers are
more productive in Java than in C/C++.  We're finally seeing decent
compilation speeds without semi-broken incremental tricks.  The sharpest
programmers I've ever encountered, with huge amounts of C++ experience,
feel similarly.  

Business:  What's being overlooked is that if Java becomes an acceptable
language (in terms of performance and UI appearance) for Windows
development, portability-schmortability, it's golden, because millions of
dollars of Windows only development is *already* a reality and anything
that gives ISVs an edge in programmer productivity and reduced bugs on ship
is something that will be investigated and adopted.  

They see it this way: "since many of our programmers never learned to play
nice with pointers, lets take that toy *away*." 

For Inferno to succeed it has to have a solid, solid niche.  Sun-Java is
floundering around trying to use the internet for this purpose (while
anyone sensible turns off all that Java and activeX nonsense).  MS-Java is
aimed at Windows development (with the portability angle being focused on
porting from one Windows platform to another).  

Which is a more sensible market?  

Which is a better strategy to emulate?

RSR

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                                http://www.wam.umd.edu/~rsrodger
                                please discontinue use of rsr@msn.com